20UNDER40 in the News

Even before its official release, the 20UNDER40 anthology had been making a buzz in the media.  Check out the links below to view some of the attention the book has received in print and through online media venues. If you are a blogger or member of the press interested in writing a review of the anthology or conducting interviews with either the editor or one of the 20UNDER40 authors, please direct your inquiry to: editor (at) 20UNDER40 (dot) org.

March 6, 2010
Chapter Mention: Boston Globe

Is the imaginative child an endangered species? In a provocative new book, Bridget Matros, cocreator of the Art Studio at the Boston Children’s Museum, asks that question and suggests ways to address the creativity deficit she sees in children and adults. Her essay appears in the anthology “20Under40: Re-Inventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century” (AuthorHouse).… In “Handprint Turkeys and the Cotton Ball Snowman: Is There Hope for an Artful America?” Matros writes about young children who, when asked to suggest an alternative use for an egg carton, “struggle to imagine. This, to me, is astounding, and gravely problematic.” She points a finger at adults who teach children that art should conform to a narrow set of rules.

Read the full article.

March 5, 2011
Anthology Reflection: “A Poor Player”

About two days ago I finished reading 20UNDER40, the collection of 20 essays on the topic of creating change in the arts sector written by people under 40 years of age.… It’s an important contribution to the conversation about where the arts are going, and I don’t think anyone should question that.… I’m truly pleased to see that people under 40 are getting their say in this book. I was never in the least concerned that people over 40 were not invited; that’s a good thing. If I could financially swing retirement tomorrow, I would gladly step aside for these people (ah, there’s the rub). They would then have the time they need to effect their changes. And I do recognize that the editor and the writers recognize that their collection has its limitations – it’s a start at the very least. Dissemination of these ideas across demographic boundaries will be key. I only hope they will have the time it takes in this fast-paced society we have created to achieve their goals.

Read the full reflection.

February 16, 2011
Book Review: Stanford Social Innovation Review
Reinventing the arts and arts education is not just about new business models. In the collection, there are punchy essays about the way art school students are graded, why contemporary dance is losing its expressive power, and why 21st-century arts educators should teach computer programming…. Although much of the book is dedicated to expressing frustration with the status quo, there is a high level of optimism about the future. That optimism is grounded in a faith that technology can be used much more creatively; that nonprofit and for-profit business models can be successful; and that Gen Xers and Millennials are going to get their art fix with or without established arts organizations…. 20Under40 puts new ideas from younger professionals on the table. Now the question is: Who will pick them up? 

Read the full review: SSIR_1

January 16, 2011
Clyde Fitch Interview Series Part 3: David J. McGraw

Now we move to the second chapter, “The Epoch Model: An Arts Organization with an Expiration Date,” by David J. McGraw…. The abstract for the chapter should raise eyebrows — in a most exciting way. It challenges the received wisdom that nonprofit arts organizations last (and should last) eternally. How this became the prevailing wisdom is [an] important question, perhaps only answerable by future cultural historians. Certainly a nonprofit business model that prizes sustainability over effectiveness is one factor. As McGraw indicates, [there] may be other factors as well.

Read the full interview.

January 3, 2011
Clyde Fitch Interview Series Part 2: Brian Newman

“…if you haven’t bought (or otherwise finagled) your copy [of 20UNDER40] yet, what on earth are you waiting for? If you’re searching for the vanguard — the real vanguard — of the arts and arts education in this, the start of the second decade of the 21st century, this is it. Waketh thyself up. Twenty chapters by under-4o writers who aren’t beholden to the status quo. Bliss.… And today, we bring you a Q&A with the first of the 20 contributors, Brian Newman. The chapter is called ‘Inventing the Future of the Arts: Seven Digital Trends that Present Challenges and Opportunities for Success in the Cultural Sector.’ While the title is fairly self-explanatory, what astonishes is its clarity, audacity and breadth.”

Read the full interview.

January 3, 2011
Book Mention and Chapter Review: San Diego Union Tribune

“Edward Clapp, the editor of 20Under40: Re-Inventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century, came to San Diego this past August to do a workshop on the arts for the San Diego Foundation. The talk, and now the book, is intended to shake things up a bit when thinking about the arts and arts education.… Schools that teach art, social trends and creativity should take a close look at the book for their classes.… Of particular interest to me is how I might incorporate one or more of these issues into the class I will be teaching at San Diego City College: Cultures of Latin America – which, by the way, also includes the border region.… In Riding through the Borderlands: Sustainable Art, Education and Social Justice, Marissa McClure discusses a university/community class and the relationships students form during the class.… McClure sees the project as crossing borders: gender, neighborhood and university/community borders. Questions asked of the students include how border consciousness might profit by engagement in a community-based project like BICAS and the related question of whether art and activism fit together.”

Read the full post.

January 2, 2011
Chapter Review and Author Interview: Globe Gazette

“David McGraw, theater arts lecturer and production stage manager at the University of Iowa, knows firsthand what it’s like to be a part of a dying arts organization.… While in college, the theater company he was involved with for two years suddenly closed.… So McGraw, 38, created a new concept for arts organizations that he believes will cure the common cause of death for many venues nationwide.… ‘When an arts organization closes, you think the community stopped supporting the arts,’ he said. ‘That’s not true…. It’s just that the arts organization ended its life cycle…’”

Read the full article.

December 27, 2010
Featured Article: Digital Art Guild

“For the 20UNDER40 authors, the future of the arts lies in what’s possible, not in what has been the status quo. ‘Why do we do what we do in the arts?’ is the taste in their mouths they wake up with in the morning. The conversation surrounding the possibilities to new alternatives to practice and potential in the arts is the meat of the matter that is always on the table.”

Read the full article.

December 21, 2010
Clyde Fitch Interview Series Part I: Edward P. Clapp

“Edited by Edward P. Clapp and featuring essays by 20 under-40 arts leaders and thinkers, 20UNDER40: Re-Inventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century is a late-2010/early-2011 must-read, although if you do try to read it in a single sitting, the only person responsible for the splattered brain matter will unquestionably, dear reader, be you. What the book really is is a paean to innovation — to the unaddressed need for a drastic overhaul of the role of the arts and arts education in American society, including a serious examination of the battered and bruised business model by which art in our nation is served, created, developed, supported, marketed, consumed and digested.… At a Dec. 13 launch party for the book here in New York City […] Clapp referred to the book as the ‘beginning of a conversation.’ That’s true. If one-twentieth of the ideas in this book for revitalizing the arts should incite a reality check — or actual change — in the sector, it will be viewed as the beginning of an era.”

Read the full interview.

December 20, 2010
Chapter Review and Author Interview: Press-Citizen

“David McGraw, theater arts lecturer and production stage manager at the University of Iowa, knows firsthand what it’s like to be a part of a dying arts organization.… While in college, the theater company he was involved with for two years suddenly closed.… So McGraw, 38, created a new concept for arts organizations that he believes will cure the common cause of death for many venues nationwide.… ‘When an arts organization closes, you think the community stopped supporting the arts,’ he said. ‘That’s not true…. It’s just that the arts organization ended its life cycle…’”

Read the full article.

December 20, 2010
Podcast Author Interview: Technology in the Arts

“For this end-of-year podcast episode, we take a look at numerous trends in the technology sector and their implications for nonprofit arts and culture organizations. David [Dombrosky] talks with Brian Newman.… Their conversation explores ways in which the trends identified in Brian’s essay will impact the creative sector as well as how arts organizations can adapt to these shifts in our culture.  Topics include:  downsizing and mergers, with-profit collaborations, disintermediation and the new role for curators, particpatory culture, electracy, and more.”

Listen to the full podcast.

December 14, 2010
Chapter Mention and Author Interview: UA News

“The undergraduate and graduate students involved in Marissa McClure’s service-learning course not only volunteer with a local nonprofit but also act as extensions of the organization. The University of Arizona class, “Community, Culture, and Art Education,” is unconventional and unique in nature – a collaborative effort to inform and engage students in community-based art education.… McClure recently co-authored a chapter with students who have taken the course that was published this month in a new book, 20UNDER40: Re-Inventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century.

Read the full article.

December 5, 2010
Interview and Book Mention: Barry’s Blog

“…there is much here to absorb and think about.  As one who champions both more discussion within the sector on the whole host of issues we face, and specifically the need for prioritizing the needs of the next generation’s role in arts administration infrastructure, I can applaud this effort from my exposure to it so far. I do think it important that as a field we support those from our field in their endeavors to write about our issues – so I encourage you to buy this book (make it a Christmas present).”

Read the full post.

December 3, 2010
Chapter Mention: Symphony Bros.

“The separation of art from arts administration was a direct response to the professionalization of the performing arts in the United States during the middle of the century.… But it doesn’t have to be this way.  One of the essays in a recently published book titled 20Under40: Re-Inventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century… deals with this very issue.  In “Redefining ‘Artist’ Administration,” Sue Landis (Weill Music Institute, Carnegie Hall) and Jessica Rivkin Larson (Stern School of Business, New York University) argue that the best artists and administrators share certain capacities, including questioning, critical listening, focused vision, and intelligent risk-taking…”

Read the full post.

December 2, 2010
Review: Dance Feast

“Reading the just-released 20Under40 anthology edited by Edward Clapp is like a meeting with twenty bright and fearless visionaries offering brave, provocative ideas for the future of the arts.  A must for anyone working in the industry…. The shared ‘ambition to do better and to understand more’ is what all of the writers of this powerful book seem to have in mind.”

Read the full review.

November 29, 2010
Review: SpringBoard Media

“There are some great chapters in here, with some pretty cool ideas. I’m not going to review the entire book here, but I can say that if you have any interest in the arts, arts participation, arts education and/or new ideas for the arts and arts education it is a great read.”

Read the full review.

November 29, 2010
Op-Ed: Press-Citizen

“Whenever I learn that an arts group is celebrating an anniversary, the first thing I want to do is congratulate them.… But why? Why is mere survival a cause for celebration? Why do we place so much importance on longevity as an indicator of artistic success? “20UNDER40,” a book project aimed at “re-inventing the arts and arts education,” gave me an opportunity to explore these questions and our beliefs about what makes arts organizations successful…”

Read the full post.

November 28, 2010
Book Mention: Createquity

“More than a year ago, a student in the Harvard Graduate School of Education named Edward P. Clapp floated an idea for an anthology of twenty essays by young(ish) arts administrators and educators, titled simply 20UNDER40. The original call for submissions got passed around every which way, garnering a total of more than 300 proposals…”

Read the full post.

November 23, 2010
Author Mention: Performing Arts at Iowa

“David J. McGraw, UI Theatre Arts Lecturer and Production Stage Manager, questions why we expect our arts organizations to last forever in the new book 20UNDER40 from www.20under40.org. The 20UNDER40 anthology, to be released December 1, kicks off a bold new dialogue concerning the future of the arts and arts education and features 20 essays written by emerging arts leaders under the age of 40.… In his essay, McGraw explains that if a theatre troupe, dance company, musical ensemble, or artist collective only operates for a few years, we consider it a failure. What would happen if we designed an arts organization with an expiration date? McGraw examines the impact on artists, managers, funders, patrons, and the community and discusses how the Epoch Model—an organizational structure that plans for the limited-lifecycle of an arts group—could not only benefit artists and audiences, but also revitalize the community and the broader arts sector…”

Read the full article.